Latin Dance Names

Darrell's database of Latin dance names:

128.252.165.14  chipanecas (chip)
128.252.165.20  rumba
128.252.165.31  milonga
128.252.165.59  salsa
128.252.165.61  ace
128.252.165.62  tao
128.252.165.67  conga
128.252.165.68  jarabe
128.252.165.69  macumbo
128.252.165.70  xongo
128.252.165.127 macarena
128.252.165.128 cueca
128.252.165.129 pachanga
128.252.165.139 lindy
128.252.165.140 tango
128.252.165.141 cha-cha
128.252.165.142 lambada
128.252.165.143 samba
128.252.165.144 mambo
128.252.165.145 merengue
128.252.165.146 waltz
128.252.165.147 cumbia
128.252.165.148 flamenco
128.252.165.149 polka
128.252.165.189 escondido
128.252.165.190 watusi
128.252.165.191 twostep
128.252.165.192 jig
128.252.165.194 bolero
128.252.165.195 corrido
128.252.165.196 danzon
128.252.165.197 limbo
128.252.165.198 guaracha
128.252.165.199 bomba
128.252.165.200 charanga
128.252.165.206 maxixe
128.252.165.208 alegrias
128.252.165.209 bambuca
128.252.165.212 beguine
128.252.165.213 calypso
128.252.165.214 carioca

ALEGRIAS: The Alegrias is one of the oldest of Spanish Gypsy dances and =
is often called the "Queen" of Flamenco dances. It is the purest and =
more refined of the repertoire. It suggests the movements of the =
bullfight and is usually danced by a woman alone.=20

BAION: A type of slow Samba rhythm from Brazil that became popular in =
North America during the 50's.

BAMBA: An old Mexican air from the province of Vera Cruz, Mexico, to =
which a charming folk dance depicts two lovers who throwing a narrow =
sash on the floor manage to tie in into a knot with their dancing feet.

BAMBUCA: The national dance of Colombia, South America. It is =
characterized by cross accents in the music. It was formerly danced only =
by the natives but became a ballroom dance to be added to the gentle =
Pasillo, a favorite with Colombian society.

BATUQUE: Afro-Brazilian jam sessions. In the Batuque the dancers form a =
circle around one performer. This solo dancer chooses his successor for =
the exhibition spot while shouting the word "Sama."=20

BEGUINE: A type of Rumba in which the accent is on the second eighth =
note of the first beat. Origins spring from Martinique and Cuba.

BOLERO: Originally a Spanish dance in 3/4 time, it was changed in Cuba =
initially into 2/4 time then eventually into 4/4. It is now present as a =
very slow type of Rumba rhythm. The music is frequently arranged with =
Spanish vocals and a subtle percussion effect, usually implemented with =
Conga or Bongos.

BOTECITA: The "Little Boat." It is Cuban dancing with a very exaggerated =
swaying of the shoulders.

BULERIAS: A Spanish Gypsy dance. Livelier and more spirited than most of =
the repertoire. It's usually danced by a whole group and could be called =
a Flamenco jam-session.

CALYPSO: The music of the typical ballads in England sung by the natives =
of Trinidad. There was no real dance but because of the extreme =
popularity of the music, in 1956, possibly due to the singer Harry =
Bellafonte, many steps were created. Most of them resemble the Cuban =
Bolero or the Martinique Beguine or even Swing.=20

CARIOCA: A native of Rio de Janeiro. Also the abbreviation of the =
Brazilian dance, the Samba Carioca. At the Carioca Carnival, from the =
moment the music starts until it dies off, people get together in =
cordoes (chains or cues). Holding hands in this fashion they sing and =
sway their bodies to the Samba-Carioca and the Marchas.=20

CHA CHA: From the less inhibited night clubs and dance halls the Mambo =
underwent subtle changes. It was triple mambo, and then peculiar =
scraping and shuffling sounds during the "tripling" produced the =
imitative sound of Cha Cha Cha. This then became a dance in itself. =
Mambo or triple Mambo or Cha Cha as it is now called, is but an advanced =
stage in interpretive social dancing born of the fusion of progressive =
American and Latin music.

CHIPANECAS: A Mexican Folk dance from the province of Chiapas. Its =
popularity is due to the charming air plus the audience participation =
during the time the dancers request the audience to clap hands with =
them. It is in 3/4 time and based on Spanish patterns.

CONGA: An African-Cuban dance characterized by the extreme violence of =
accents on the strong beats in 2/4 time. The Conga beat thus used has a =
rhythmic anticipation of the second beat in every other measure. The =
Conga was very popular in the late thirties. It was performed in a =
formation known as the Conga chain. The steps are simple, one, two, =
three, kick at which time the partners move away from each other.

CORRIDOS: The musical ballads called the Corridos play a very important =
part in Latin American musical life. The words are often topical and =
relate to political events. It has been suggested that the word Corrido =
is derived from the word correr, to run, because the singer has to run =
for his life when caught in the process of reciting a subversive ditty. =
Corridos are particularly popular in Mexico.

DANZON: A Cuban dance which starts slowly and gradually accelerates at =
certain melodic intervals between chorus and verse: the dancers stop to =
talk but remain on the floor until a certain beat tells them to resume =
their dances. This dance, which might be called a Rumba variation is in =
a 4/4 time. Its stately music is popular in the tropics because it is =
not strenuous. It is know as the aristocrat of all Cuban dancing because =
of its dignified and stately appearance.=20

DOMINICAN MERENGUE: The dance of the Dominican Republic is 2/4 time with =
syncopation of the first beat interpreted by the dancers as a slight =
limp. It became popular in 1957.

ESCONDIDO: An Argentine dance called Escondido (literally hidden for in =
it the female partner hides from the male) belongs to the Gato type =
rhythmically and choreographically.

FADO: Originally a Portuguese song and dance absorbed by Latin America =
and especially by Brazil as a pattern for the Samba. The steps of the =
Fado are based on a hop, a skip and a kick in 2/4 time. It makes a =
charming exhibition folk dance.

FANDANGO: Most important of the modern Spanish dances, for couples. The =
dance begins slowly and tenderly, the rhythm marked by the clack of =
castanets, snapping of fingers, and stomping of feet. The speed =
gradually increases to a whirl of exhilaration. There is a sudden pause =
in the music toward the end of each figure when the dancers stand rigid =
in the attitude caught by the music. They move again only when the music =
is resumed. This is also characteristic of Seguidillas, similar to Jota.

FARANDOLE: A dance Haute from Provence, France. A typical variation was =
a quick gallop step danced by a procession winding in and out in single =
file, headed by a musician who played a drum and fife at the time =
skipping along without losing a beat. 6/8 or 4/4 time.

FARUCA: The dance of Spain most suited to a man. It is a pure Gypsy =
dance in 2/4 time consisting of heel work, fast double turns and falls. =
It is considered one of the most exciting of all the same Flamenco =
dances.

GATO: Argentine dance performed by two couples. In rhythm it resembles a =
very fast Waltz in steady quarter notes. A very popular form is the Gato =
con Pelaciones - that is Gato with stories. The stories are the =
diversified content; amorous, philosophical or political.

GUAJIRA: This dance was originally a Andalusian dance derived from =
Sevillanos. This dance which was played in 3/4 or 6/8 time was a Cuban =
Country dance as well, performed in Conga rhythm to the music marked Son =
Guajira. In ballroom terminology a Rumba is slow to medium tempo, or =
danced as a very slow Cha Cha, with subtle body movements.

GUARACHA: This lively Cuban song and dance of Spanish origin is =
performed in 2/4 time and danced by the more expert and agile dancers =
only, as its speed is rather imposing. a) An old Spanish dance in two =
sections. One is lively triple and the other in double. It originally =
was played in 4/4 time. b) A modern Rumba usually played very fast.

IBO: The Ibo rhythm belongs to the faster Haitian Merengue group of =
dancers. It is colorful, native in style and can be classified as =
"Caribbean dancing." A pronounced movement of hips and turning of the =
head is typical.

JARABE: The Jarabes are typical Mexican Folk dances. Usually done by a =
couple, it depicts a flirtation and conquest. It is well known in =
America by its other name, "The Mexican Hat Dance." The Mexican Jarabe =
is a descendant of the Spanish Zapateado, and its rhythm resembles that =
of a Mazurka. It is in 3/4 time.

JARANA: Folk dance of Yucatan, Mexico. It is possibly closer to the =
melo-rhythmic foundation of the ancient Mexican songs than any other =
native air. The verses of the Jarana are often in the Mayan language. =
The word Jarana means merry chatter. It is exciting in its rhythm based =
on a combination of 6/8 and 3/4 time. As an exhibition ballroom dance it =
can be placed alongside La Raspa and La Bamba, its cousins.

KANKUKUS: Afro-Brazilian dances of the Mestiso Indians.=20

LA CUECA: La Cueca is a Chilian dance written in 6/8 time with the =
accompaniment in 3/4 time. Originally it was danced with handkerchiefs =
only, but during recent years it has enjoyed popularity on the ballroom =
floor.

LA RASPA: A Mexican dance from Vera Cruz, which reminds us of our own =
square dancing except that it has a peculiar hopping step of its own. It =
has enjoyed a well merited popularity for a number of years as a fun =
dance.

LAMBADA: This latest dance crazy has its roots from the Northeast Coast =
of Brazil. The exciting look of this dance on European television took =
the Continent by storm in the late 80's. Introduced to the U.S. by =
Arthur Murray personnel, its lighthearted Brazilian/Caribbean beat =
combines the flavor of the Samba with the sultry passion of the Rumba.

MACUMBO: An African Brazilian ritual and like dances belonging to it.

MAMBO: The fusion of Swing and Cuban music produced this fascinating =
rhythm and in turn created a new sensational dance. The Mambo could not =
have been conceived earlier since up until that time Cuba and the =
American Jazz were still not wedded. The Victor records of Anselmo =
Sacaras entitled "Mambo" in 1944 were probably the beginning and since =
then other Latin American bandleaders such as Tito Rodriguez, Pupi =
Campo, Tito Puente, Perez Prado, Machito and Xavier Cugat have achieved =
styling of their own and furthered the Mambo craze. The Mambo was =
originally played as any Rumba with a riff ending. It may be described =
as a riff or a Rumba with emphasis on the fourth beat 4/4' time. =
Originally played by some musicians in 2/4 time with a break or emphasis =
on 2 and 4. Native Cubans or dancers, without any training would break =
on any beat.

MARCHA: Latin American counterpart of our One-Step.

MARTINIQUE BEGUINE: Popular ballroom dance of the island of St. Lucia =
and Martinique. It is characterized by the rocking back and forth of the =
hips while the girl throws her arms around her partner's neck. His arms =
loosely clasp her about the waist. The steps have been incorporated in =
both the Haitian Merengue and Calypso.

MAXIXE: A Brazilian dance first introduced in Paris in 1912. It is in =
2/4 time of rapid tempo with a slight syncopation. In this dance strict =
attention must be paid to the carriage of the head and the posturing of =
the arms.

MENTO: The most popular native dance of Jamaica which resembles a Rumba =
played in slow tempo.

MILONGA: The Milonga is a Spanish dance first originated in Andalusia. =
As the fascinating music traveled the world it assumed various aspects. =
In Buenos Aires the Gauchos danced it in what is called a closed =
position, in the lower class cafes. Here their interpretation of it =
emerged into what today is our Tango. The Milonga enjoyed a popular =
resurgence some years ago through the Juan Carlos Copes group who =
performed it the world over.

MINUET: It was a carefree and lively dance until presented by the French =
court in 1650. There it developed into a slow and stately dance, elegant =
in its simplicity. It consists of a salute to the partner, a high step =
and a balance, and affords numerous opportunities for an exchange of =
courtly gestures, bows and curtsies.=20

MODINHA: Among the Brazilian dances there is the Modinha which is the =
diminutive of Moda (Mode or Style) and is directly derived from the =
Portuguese songs and dances of that name. The early Modinhas were =
greatly influenced by Italian music. The present day Modinhas are =
sentimental in mood and similar to the Cuban Boleros.=20

PACHANGA: In 1955 Eduardo Davidson, a Cuban Colombian introduced the =
Marencumbae, a Colombian dance in Cuba. The Original music was called La =
Pachanga with Marencumbae underneath it. He made up patterns for this =
dance by watching musicians keeping time on the band stand. It was then =
introduced into the United States to play for the Cuban Embassy's annual =
affair at the Waldorf. He was simultaneously booked at the Palladium. He =
had with him two terrific boy dancers. These boys came out as part of =
the show and did Cha Cha's with swiveling and trucking movements. People =
had never seen this type of Cha Cha before and asked what it was. Since =
Fajardo had a Charanga band and spoke no English, his reply was =
Charanga. After a big conference of dancers in 1956 the Pachanga was =
introduced, but they found out that the Charanga and the Pachanga were =
interchangeable. So instead of some calling it Charanga and others =
Pachanga, they decided that the music would be called Charanga and the =
dance Pachanga. A Charanga band is the typical Spanish Danzon type band =
that only played in salons, and theothers that played far out and wild =
were called "orchestra typical."

PASO DOBLE FLAMENCO: The same as the Paso Doble but it is not the =
ballroom version. It is purely exhibition dancing and sometimes =
castanets are used or Flamenco arm movements.

PLENA: Several distinctive airs have originated in Puerto Rico. Among =
them the Plena, which is a topical ballad similar to the Mexican =
Corrido. When danced it resembles a Bolero.

PORRO: A Colombian dance. It is similar to the Cuban Rumbas in that it =
expresses various activities or tells stories set to a very syncopated =
2/4 meter.

QUADRILLE: The Quadrille is a "Set" dance. It consists of a series of =
dance figures, the most frequently used is called the "Flirtation" =
figure, in which the man dances with each woman in turn.=20

RUMBA: The Rumba was originally a marriage dance. Many of its movements =
and actions which seem to have an erotic meaning are merely depictions =
of simple farm tasks. The shoeing of the mare, the climbing of a rope, =
the courtship of the rooster and the hen, etc. It was done for amusement =
on the farms by the black population of Cuba. However, it became a =
popular ballroom dance and was introduced in the United States about =
1933. It was the Americanized version for the Cuban Son and Danzon. It =
is in 4/4 time. The characteristic feature is to take each step without =
initially placing the weight on that step. Steps are made with a =
slightly bent knee which, when straightened, causes the hips to sway =
from side to side in what has come to be known as "Cuban Motion."

SALSA: This is a favored name for a type of Latin music which, for the =
most part, has its roots in Cuban culture and is enhanced by jazz =
textures. The word, Salsa, means sauce denoting a "hot" flavor and is =
best distinguished from other Latin music styles by defining it as the =
New York sound developed by Puerto Rican musicians in New York. The =
dance structure is largely associated with mambo type patterns and has a =
particular feeling that is associated mainly with the Clave and the =
Montuno.

SAMBA: This Brazilian dance was first introduced in 1917 but was finally =
adopted by Brazilian society in 1930 as a ballroom dance. It is =
sometimes referred to as a Samba, Carioca, a Baion or a Batucado. The =
difference is mostly in the tempo played since the steps in all three =
dance are very similar. The style is to bounce steadily and smoothly in =
2/4 meter. They say that the Samba was introduced in the United States =
in 1939 by the late Carmen Miranda.=20

SON: A Cuban dance similar to the Bolero except that it is wilder in =
rhythmic accent and more violent in step pattern. It is the Son which =
first served as a basis for the Mambo which in turn became the triple =
Mambo, now known as Cha Cha. This slow rhythmic dance was originally in =
2/4 time. It became Americanized and is usually played in 4/4 time.

TANGO: Continental/English - See INTERNATIONAL TANGO There are =
essentially three types of Tango - Argentine, American and International =
Style. Argentine Tango: (arrabalero) A dance created by the Gauchos in =
Buenos Aires. It was actually an attempt on their part to imitate the =
Spanish dance except that they danced it in a closed ballroom position. =
The Tango caused a sensation and was soon to be seen the world over in a =
more subdued version. American Tango: Unlike the Argentine Tango, in =
which the dancer interprets the music spontaneously without any =
predetermined slows or quicks, the American Tango features a structure =
which is correlated to the musical phrasing. The dance is executed both =
in closed position and in various types of extravagant dance =
relationships which incorporate a particular freedom of expression that =
is not present in the International style. International Tango: This is =
a highly disciplined and distinctively structured form of the Tango =
which is accepted worldwide as the format for dancesport events. The =
dancers remain in traditional closed position throughout and expresses =
both legato and staccato aspects of the type of music appropriate to =
this style.

XONGO: (CHAN GO) A dance of the Macumba ritual in Brazil. It is in honor =
of the jungle god Xango.

XTOLES: (CHI TOL LES) The Mayan Warriors dance of Mexico.=20

ZAPATEADO: The Spanish and Flamenco dances of Spain in which rhythmic =
patterns are made with the heel and ball of Filigrano. Also a man's =
dance which consists purely of intricate stomping.